Prevent | Counter Terrorism Policing

North East – Prevent

 

Prevent is a vital part of the national counter terrorism strategy to stop people becoming terrorists or supporting terrorism. In the North East we have a specialist team of officers supporting this area of policing.

Prevent forms part of the Government’s Counter Terrorism Strategy CONTEST.

The vast majority of people living in this country do not support terrorism. However, there are those who seek to promote extremist and terrorist ideologies. They also look to radicalise and recruit vulnerable people, cause fear and harm our communities.

These threats come from a range of sources including International Terrorism (for example Al Qa’ida and like-minded groups), Northern Ireland Related Terrorism and Domestic Extremism (for example far right extremists).

Working to prevent terrorism is about challenging these ideas and those who promote them. Together, the Police and partners work to support those individuals and institutions that may be vulnerable through projects such as community programmes, discussion forums, educational and recreational activities.

 

What is an extremist?

The definition of an extremist is someone who is vocally or actively opposed to British values. This includes democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual tolerance of different faiths and beliefs. The Prevent Strategy also defines an extremist as a person who calls for the death of members of our armed forces, whether in this country or overseas.

 

What is ideology?

Ideology is a set of ideas and beliefs which form a worldview that provides the basis for action that is intended to preserve or change the existing social and political order.

 

Channel Project

The Channel Project is a process involving a number of organisations which provides support to those who may be vulnerable to being drawn into supporting terrorism or terrorist activities.

Channel is voluntary and as part of the process the agencies will work together to assess the nature and risk to a person of radicalisation. An appropriate support package will then be created which is tailor made to a person’s needs.

The programme is very similar to existing initiatives which aim to support vulnerable individuals and protect them from other forms of harm, such as involvement in drugs and gangs, or from exploitation and abuse. By giving support to people most at risk, they can be diverted away from any potential threat, which could otherwise draw them into criminal activity.

Channel forms part of the Government’s Prevent Strategy

 

How does a person become part of the Channel Project?

A person will be considered for the Channel Project following a referral from a wide range of sources which may include youth offending teams, social services, health, police and members of the public.

Channel is voluntary and individuals do not get a criminal record from being on the programme.

 

Which organisations are involved in Channel?

This will depend on what organisations can provide the best support to address a person’s needs. The process may include people from:

  • Local Authorities
  • Adult and Children Services
  • Emergency Services
  • Youth Offending Teams
  • UK Border Forces
  • Community and Voluntary Service
  • Local Community Representatives

 

What type of support does Channel provide?

Some examples of the types of activities that are included in support of Channel can include:

  • Life skills
  • Mentoring support
  • Anger Management sessions
  • Victim Awareness contact
  • Education skills
  • Family support
  • Health awareness
  • Drugs and alcohol awareness

 

Is Channel aimed at specific people?

Channel is designed for any individual who may be vulnerable to harm or exploitation from those who seek to further a terrorist cause or ideology.

It applies to all communities and its’ members who may be the focus of attention from terrorists. This includes those at risk from groups supporting international terrorism, far right extremist ideologies, Northern Ireland Related and other forms of terrorism.

Channel is voluntary and individuals do not get a criminal record from being on the programme.

The programme is very similar to existing initiatives which aim to support vulnerable individuals and protect them from other forms of harm, such as involvement in drugs and gangs, or from exploitation and abuse.